Born To Learn

Born To Learn

Born to Learn is the first animation in a fascinating series aimed to provide easy-access to the exciting new discoveries constantly being made about how humans learn!
Ego: Playing an Altruistic Game

Ego: Playing an Altruistic Game

There is little point in discussing how each of us should change since everyone is shaped by one’s immediate environment—family, school, and society. If, however, we begin to act as if we are playing a fun game called “altruism,” it will become the most engaging game we have ever played, a life-changing one. It will be so much fun that we will gladly dedicate all our free time to building a good environment, founded on mutual responsibility. Our egos will gladly join the game because all the ego cares about is feeling good. Indeed, it is easy to change when motivated by each other’s support. We need only agree to mutual responsibility. This is our “red carpet” to the future we all desire, a life of balance, peace, prosperity, and security. Responsibility is an ability to choose how we respond to our egoism, and at this stage in our individual and collective evolution, we are required to start using it to serve our common interest. A question may arise: If it is so easy, why haven’t we done this before? The truth is that our egoism has been evolving, and until now, we couldn’t recognize its magnitude and how far it is willing to push us in pursuit of pleasure. We convinced ourselves that the ego helps us advance through competition and winning, and that it drives progress, both personal and collective. We did not regard it as destructive. Yet, look at how we’ve grown apart. We are separated, alienated, and engrossed in self-entitlement. We never dreamed that this would lead us to the devastating destruction that we are witnessing today. Only now are...
J.C. Pearce “Biological and Spiritual Growth”

J.C. Pearce “Biological and Spiritual Growth”

Optimal development in children is thwarted by a variety of factors from modern hospital delivery methods to the educational system itself. Joseph Chilton Pearce, author of The Crack in the Cosmic Egg and Magical Child, suggests that current problems with child rearing are so immense, that they are virtually insolvable. However, parents who are truly concerned must begin by discovering within themselves the spiritual nature of...
The Wisdom Series

The Wisdom Series

Joseph Chilton Pearce pioneers the first of the TMI Wisdom Series. Joe is an author of a number of books on child development. Here, he presents the idea of the heart, or compassionate mind, as another categorization of brain function with equal stature as the thalamus, prefrontal cortex, and lower brain. He believes that active, imaginative play is the most important of all childhood activities because that cultivates a mastery of one’s environment. He coins the term “creative competence” to discuss that mastery. Further, children without that form of play develop feelings of isolation and anxiety. He also believes that child-parent bonding is important, and blames both a lack of breastfeeding and modern childbirth as obstructive to that...
How Television Works

How Television Works

Devon Grey’s new trilogy, The Corporate Media Survival Guide introduces viewers to television’s hidden technology and the unspoken corporate agenda that surrounds it. Segmented into five informative and entertaining sections, ‘How Television Works’ is a must see for anyone curious about who controls television, why producers alter their programming to appease corporate sponsors, and what detrimental effects television has on human brain chemistry, attention span and...
What Is Happening with Our Youth?

What Is Happening with Our Youth?

More and more youngsters are succumbing to depression and a lack of care and concern for themselves and others which have in turn manifested in reckless behaviors such as drug use, sexual promiscuity, and horrendous acts of violence toward themselves or others. What has brought about the despair our young generation is experiencing today? They are not satisfied with the pleasures that previous generations enjoyed. As I sit down to read the newspaper, the headlines hit me once again. A teenager stepped into a crowded holiday shopping mall and opened fire, killing eight people. What could lead a young person with a bright future ahead of him to commit such a desperate act? Meanwhile, a dear friend’s niece clings to life in a hospital after swallowing a bottle of pills in a suicide attempt.  Depression among teenagers has reached epidemic proportions. What is happening to our youth? Aren’t teenagers too young to be overwhelmed by feelings of despair and hopelessness? There are many countries in the world where despair would be understandable—countries where unbelievable hardship, poverty, starvation and violence are a daily reality. But this is the United States—many of these kids come from affluent, loving homes where they have every advantage that money can buy. One would think they should be much more fulfilled than people from countries struggling to feed, educate, and house their citizens, but it is quite the opposite. Depression is a phenomenon that exists in more developed societies and not in ones that are struggling for survive. At the other end of the spectrum, we see a growing number of people who are stuck...